Treading the boards with Shakespeare

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Prospero blog, 20 June 2012

ELIZABETHAN theatre remains a somewhat elusive world to scholars. Limited records have left wide gaps in our knowledge. So the recent discovery of the remains of a theatre in Shoreditch, east London, is a big deal.

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Cloud gaming: Pick up and play

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Schumpeter blog, 25 July 2012

WHETHER as cassette tapes, cartridges or discs, video games have for ever been accessed through tangible media. They may not be for much longer.

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Atari Teenage Riot: The Inside Story Of Pong And The Video Game Industry's Big Bang

This story appeared on BuzzFeed, 29 November 2012

On Nov. 29, 1972, a crude table-tennis arcade game in a garish orange cabinet was delivered to bars and pizza parlors around California, and a multi-billion-dollar industry was born. Here’s how that happened, direct from the freaks and geeks who invented a culture and paved the way for today’s tech moguls.

Building bridges as the Eurozone buckles

Originally appeared on Tumblr’s Storyboard blog, 16 October 2012

Three years ago, graphic designer Robin Stam was at his favorite pizzeria in Rotterdam, waiting to pay after finishing his meal. Fingering the euro bank notes in his wallet, Stam focused on the depictions of bridges on the reverse side of the money.

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F for effort

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Game Theory blog, 2 August 2012

THE Olympics are supposed to offer spectators the world’s greatest athletes giving their best efforts in all 26 sports. The fans at a farcical women’s doubles badminton match between pairs from China and South Korea on July 31st were treated to substantially less.

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Driving lessons

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Schumpeter blog, 6 July 2012

DRIVING is expensive. The average Briton spends £1,200 ($1,800) on learning how to drive—before even considering buying a car, getting it insured, filling it with petrol and purchasing the all important pink fluffy dice to hang from the rear view mirror.

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With sympathy

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Schumpeter blog, 28 May 2012

STOCK up on sympathy cards: Britain’s high street is mourning another loss. In a downsizing that began last week, Clinton Cards, a seller of greeting cards, is to close 350 shops and cut 2,800 jobs, about half of the total workforce.

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Project Unbreakable: Stories of Surviving Sexual Assault

Originally appeared on Tumblr’s Storyboard blog, 2 October 2012

“It’s time to talk about it,” is 20-year old Grace Brown’s message.

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Bereavement to orientation tomes!

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Johnson blog, 30 April 2012

PETER MARK ROGET was, by all accounts, a bit of a nerd. Some kids collect stamps; others meticulously record baseball scores.

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Up in flames

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Prospero blog, 26 April 2012

SOMETHING odd is happening at the Casoria Contemporary Art Museum (CAM), near Naples.

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Hooray for Hollywood?

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Johnson blog, 17 April 2012

MEMORABILITY is something we all strive for, whether it’s making a big impression at a party or leaving a legacy to the world.

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Home groan

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Game Theory blog, 18 April 2012

SET to meet Portugal’s Sporting Lisbon on April 19th in the semi-finals of the Europa League, a tournament for top-flight European football clubs, Spain’s Athletic Bilbao has quickly become the bookmakers’ favourite to win the entire competition.

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Pizza app: Britain’s takeaway business

Appeared in 21 April print edition of The Economist. Originally appeared on The Economist’s Schumpeter blog, 5 April 2012

BRITONS love their takeaways. A £4.8 billion ($7.6 billion) industry has sprung up around the dietary needs of late night revellers and working families looking for a treat at the end of the week.

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An ugly game

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Game Theory blog, 4 April 2012

PROFESSIONAL football players have to put up with hostile crowds, angry coaches and scathing stories in the press no matter where they play. But in eastern Europe they live with more serious forms of abuse.

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Journalese: a strange English dialect

Originally appeared on The Economist’s Johnson blog, 3 April 2012

TRAINS are a great place to meet people. Close proximity to a complete stranger for a finite period of time expands the horizons. Thus your correspondent found himself on the 17.02 train from Newcastle to York, iPad on lap, tapping out a post for Johnson last weekend.

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